Tag Archives: Tintin

Info wanted on these 2 Bob De Moor ‘Explorers on the Moon’ advert sketches

This morning we received the following scans of 2 drawings (each sized 13,5 x 10 cm), both were sketched by Bob De Moor.

Both sketches feature elements from the 7th Tintin album “Explorers on the Moon”, the first one showing a drunk Captain Haddock floating in space (taken from page 10 in the album), the second showing Captain Haddock jumping high in the airless sky of the moon due to the lower gravity forces (this scene takes place on page 26 of the album) with Tintin and Snowy watching.

We have been asked for some more info on what these sketches were made for. It’s presumed that they were made for bigger drawings to be featured on towels which were sold in the mid eighties like this one below. If you have some more info, please mail us at bernard.vanisacker@gmail.com .

If you pay some close attention to the sketches, you’ll notice that there are some differences when you compare these sketches with the final album versions.

The first sketch has a different angle than the original sketch while the second picture has the moonrocket in the background which is not the case in the album version, and Snowy has also appeared in the sketch, presumably to give it an extra touch as was going to be used for commercial products.

If you have more info regarding these sketches, where the final drawings were used, etc please let us know!

Bob De Moor explains how he worked on ‘The lake of Sharks’ animation film (The Johannes Stawowy Archives – Part 4)

Johannes Stawowy‘s personal archives of Bob De Moor‘s visit to Mülheim, Germany back in 1986 keep on revealing their secrets. Today we received some further material which Bob De Moor drew during the Q&A session in March 1986. As you might remember, In this article we showed you a photograph of Bob De Moor explaining how he worked on the “Lake of Sharks” animation film.

A sketch by Bob De Moor made in Mülheim, Germany in 1986.
A sketch by Bob De Moor made in Mülheim, Germany in 1986.

Today we present you a frontal shot of said drawing. We have enhanced the colors a bit for clarity because the combination of cheap paper, markers and some 29 years didn’t exactly improve the quality. The drawing shows 3 sequences in which Bob De Moor explained how the animators had to work in order to bring Tintin to live for the “Lake of Sharks” animation film. Although graphically this is quite hasty work, the intention here was to instruct and not to create a good drawing of course.

Tomorrow we’ll show you 2 more drawings, which unfortunately also suffered from the time and also some water damage. Nevertheless, you’ll be able to meet Tintin, Snowy and Thomson and Thompson

Adolf Hitler pastiche in ‘The Lord of Gonobutz’

In the 1976 Barelli album “Le seigneur de Gonobutz” (“The Lord of Gonobutz”) the military theme is omnipresent. The fact that Bob De Moor & Hergé just had finished the Tintin album “Tintin and the Picaros” isn’t really strange to that. Also in the album by Hergé the military is omnipresent. Whereas Hergé tackled the South-American regimes (left and right), Bob De Moor decided to loosely base his new Barelli album on Hergé‘s scenario for his very own take on dictatorships.

The Nazi Swastika like flag + Adolf Hitler painting the wall.
The Nazi Swastika like flag + Adolf Hitler painting the wall.

Just like in “Tintin and the Picaros”, “The Lord of Gonobutz” starts with an ‘involuntary invitation’ to another country (Barelli and his aunt are kidnapped to Rocca Negro by uncle Victorino) and just like in “Tintin and the Picaros”, “The Lord of Gonobutz” holds references to the Nazis.

Lieutenant Grimca gives orders to Adolf Hitler
Lieutenant Grimca gives orders to Adolf Hitler

In the Tintin story Colonel Sponsz, the former chief of the Bordurian secret police ZEP, is clearly etched on an SS-officer (although he is a member of a communist regime in “The Calculus Affair” he wears a uniform which reminds of that of the SS as designed by Hugo Boss) and in “The Lord of Gonobutz” we not only see a very Nazi-like flag being used but we also find out that none else but Adolf Hitler himself painting the wall of a house, which is a clear reference to Hitler’s first unsuccessful artistic career as a painter in Vienna, Austria.

Adolf Hitler KO thanks to Sophia Barelli
Adolf Hitler KO thanks to Sophia Barelli

Bob De Moor decided to put Hitler in quite a subordinate position (next to his chief Lieutenant Grimca) ridiculing him totally. And as icing on the cake, Barelli’s aunt Sophia even succeeds in smothering him with her weight as she jumps in his arms as a mouse appears. He doesn’t return to consciousness, at least not in the story.

This album is a must if you want to see how much the styles of Bob De Moor and Hergé were symbiotic. The album is stylistically excellent, although we’d have preferred a more worked out cover for the album itself. The story isn’t really meant to be taken serious and goes from joke to joke.