Tag Archives: Thomas Brügger

Greetings aus der Schweiz! Mit Bob De Moor (Part 2)

Last week we posted a first article based on a few pictures that were sent to the family De Moor by Swiss Bob De Moor fan Thomas Brügger. We’ll present 4 of these pictures. Today we serve you the second picture which shows Bob De Moor in a rather unusual posture in his home in Ukkel at the Square Coghen. And again some details reveal a bit a more than what you see on first sight.

A picture taken of Bob De Moor in front of the model of an English merchant brig from 1850.
A picture taken of Bob De Moor in front of the model of an English merchant brig from 1850.

The picture you see here was also taken on July 20th, 1989. Some readers who also have the book “Bob de Moor. 40 ans de bandes dessinées, 35 ans aux côtés d’Hergé” will without any doubt recognize the model of an English merchant brig from 1850 which was also featured on a photo on page 72 of said book. A brig was a sailing vessel with two square-rigged masts. During the ‘Age of Sail’, brigs were seen as fast and maneuverable and were used as both naval warships and merchant vessels. In the picture we show you here you can also see the front of the sailing vessel which was not visible in the Lombard published Bob De Moor biography.

A wine vignette drawn in 1986.
A wine vignette drawn in 1986.

You can also see Bob De Moor standing in front of the vessel apparently doing a captain Haddock aka pretending to empty a bottle of wine. The bottle of wine looks like the “Chai de Bordes” from 1986 which had a drawing – a ‘vignette’ – featuring Barelli (thanks to Alain Demaret for the scan). You can see an example of the vignette on the left. It shows Barelli with a castle in the background. It’s obviously not the Moulinsart castle. You’ll also notice the bandage around Bob De Moor‘s left arm which was heavily bruised after slipping and consequently falling from an embankment during a holiday at the Belgian coast, in Knokke to be precise.

Although it’s not really easy to see what is in the bookcase, you can differentiate 3 Rombaldi volumes, 2 of which are presumably the Monsieur Tric / Balthazar volume and the Barelli volume. The 3rd volume is probably the Lefranc volume featuring the “Le repaire du loup” album next to “La grande menace”, “L’ouragan de feu” and “Le mystère Borg”. You can also recognize the complete Brabantia Nostra series (6 volumes) on the right. We’ll be talking more about the library from Bob De Moor in later posts.

In front of Bob De Moor on the small table you see a few albums from Cori, Johan et Stephan and Barelli (you know which ones?). All of the albums on the picture are probably in french. They are hardcovers, flemish albums usually had a soft cover (except for a few very limited editions and the Dutch version of the Barelli album “Le Seigneur de Gonobutz”). On the left you see what looks like a reproduction of the pencilled frontcover of the commissioned “Een Afspraak in 2009” album.

Tomorrow we’ll present you a cartoon from the De Moor archives, which many will never have seen before.

Greetings aus der Schweiz! Mit Bob De Moor (Part 1)

A few days ago we received a few pictures that were sent to the family De Moor by a Swiss Bob De Moor fan, namely Thomas Brügger. The pictures were taken in summer of 1990 1989, more precisely July 20th, so Bob De Moor was working on the Blake and Mortimer album “Professor Sató’s Three Formulae, Volume 2: Mortimer vs. Mortimer”. And although we haven’t received much more information, some of the pictures will be quite interesting for many readers. We’ll pick 4 of these. Today we start with the first picture.

Picture taken by Thomas Brügger in Summer of 1990.
Picture taken by Thomas Brügger in Summer of 1990.

This picture shows Bob De Moor working at his desk at his home in Ukkel at the Square Coghen. As you know, by the end of 1986 the Studios Hergé had closed and Bob De Moor, together with everybody else working there, had been fired. As a result Bob De Moor had to settle himself again as an independent cartoonist and from then on worked only from his home. The mirror you see in front of Bob De Moor is the same one he had used at the Studios Hergé. Here’s a small hint for those wondering how we know: you can recognize the green frame with the rounded corners which was exactly the same as he had at the Avenue Louise (see also the photos in this article). In the reflection you see not only Bob De Moor but also a head of Captain Haddock.

On the left of the mirror you see the sculpted heads of Professor Sató and of Toshiro, 2 characters from the Blake and Mortimer album “Professor Sató’s Three Formulae, Volume 2: Mortimer vs. Mortimer”. These were made one demand by Edgar P. Jacobs to help him to draw the characters in different head positions. On the extreme left you can still see the hair of a carton board silhouette of Tintin. In front of the mirror you see a small matchbox type car which looks like a white version of the green Datsun as used in the Blake and Mortimer album on page 9.

In the holders in front of the mirror, on the extreme left you can see a detail of the yellow card which the Studios Hergé gave to people announcing they had changed telephone number. It’s Nestor’s head you see there saying “Allo? Le nouveau numéro de téléphone des STUDIOS HERGE ? … 02-647.51.90 (trois lignes)”. The truth is in the details n’est-ce pas?

You can also see several comics laying in front of him (including “Barelli et les agents secrets”) plus a magazine released by the German publisher Comicplus+ on top. The magazine is the 48 page counting “Hommage an Hergé” which was released in 1986. Next on the right you can see several polaroid photo’s which Bob De Moor had used for the Blake and Mortimer album “Professor Sató’s Three Formulae, Volume 2: Mortimer vs. Mortimer”, an album which he had finished in February of that year. You’ll recognize Annemie De Moor posing as an android, flat on her belly in bed. She would also pose for the android as used on the first frame of page 40 of that album. On the right you see a polaroid photo of Stefaan De Moor doing a Sharkey for a frame which would be used on page 17 of that album.

Tomorrow we’ll dissect an other picture from the collection of Thomas Brügger.