Tag Archives: Studios Hergé

Bob De Moor draws Agent Officer No. 15 on a memo for the Tintin Journal

Bob De Moor is know for having drawn a lot of drawings on all kind of documents. Today we present you a Studios Hergé document which was recently auctioned for a little more than 350 Euro if memory serves me right.

Bob De Moor draws Agent Officer No. 15 on a memo for the Tintin Journal

The document is actually a memo which was used by Bob De Moor to clarify that he had sent 11 coloured pages in the Monsieur Tric series to the Tintin Journal offices situated at the Editions Du Lombard. The pages sent were for the story “Une course de ballon mouvementée”, which was originally published in 1955 but re-published in colour in 1983 (the print was done in a very poor way we must say, it’s a mystery how that ever left the pressing plant to begin with, but more on that later).

Also included in the memo was the information that 2 coloured Quick & Flupke pages were shipped off to the Tintin Journal offices. The letter dates from 29 April 1983, about 2 months after Hergé succumbed (3 March 1983), which shows the studio was at that time still functional and producing (new) material.

But Bob De Moor fans are of course mostly interested in the quick drawing Bob De Moor added on the memo, namely one of Officer No. 15 (Agent Nr. 15 in French) which you must know from the Quick & Flupke series. Like said earlier, De Moor did a lot of these drawings on documents he sent off to the Tintin Journal offices featuring a set of characters, from Blake & Mortimer to Tintin. It kinda shows that De Moor was really enjoying his job, a job which a few years later he’d be forced to quit when the studios disbanded in 1987 and transformed into the Hergé Foundation.

But for the time being, Bob (and Johan) De Moor was still unaware of the enormous storm which would break out…

Barelli and Tintin in Germany (The Johannes Stawowy Archives – Part 3)

In November 2014 we presented you 2 articles based on Johannes Stawowy‘s archives of Bob De Moor‘s visit to Mülheim, Germany back in 1986, and more precisely the Q&A session which took place on March 14 & 15 of 1986. There is a lot more that can be told from this visit to Germany, so today we bring you part 3.

Barelli - Mülheim, Germany, 1986
Barelli – Mülheim, Germany, 1986

But Bob De Moor did more than just answering questions as you can read in this and this article. Johannes now sent us 2 extra photographs of drawings which Bob De Moor made in Mülheim.

They were drawn on the paper board that De Moor used during his Q&A session and on which he drew various examples of Tintin characters and explained how they were being drawn for use in the animated Belvision film “The lake of Sharks”. Note that this is/was not the easiest way of drawing as many comic authors will acknowledge.

Tintin - Mülheim, Germany, 1986
Tintin – Mülheim, Germany, 1986

The first drawing shows Barelli reading his own adventures and saying that the stories are great. The second one shows a very simplified drawing of the cover of the Tintin album “Red Rackham’s Treasure”. If you look well you can actually see Bob De Moor‘s signature on the bottom right with underneath it, ‘Studios Hergé‘.

In the next days and weeks we’ll continue with more articles based on the archives of Johannes Stawowy.

Tintin and Captain Haddock go Stella Artois with Bob De Moor

In the archives of the family De Moor we stumbled on a drawing Bob De Moor made for the Studios Hergé (Publiart to be precise) and it shows Captain Haddock, Tintin and Snowy on a boat. Tintin is pointing to a star on the horizon – which is in reality a pint of beer from the Stella Artois brand – and shouts “Stella à babord” which stands for “Stella on the port bow!” The reason why Tintin is referring to Stella and not Stella Artois is because Stella Artois is informally often called Stella. Good to know, stella is also the Latin and Italian word for “star”.

Tintin goes Stella with Bob De Moor
Tintin goes Stella with Bob De Moor

The drawing was according to us never used, at least we couldn’t find back any finalised publicity that represents this drawing. In case you have seen this before, contacts us please.

For the non beer fanatics, a Stella is a pilsner beer of between 4.8 and 5.2% ABV (Alcohol by volume). It has been brewed in Leuven, Belgium, since 1926, although it is being brewed in other locations as well now. A lower alcohol content (4% ABV) version is also sold in the UK, Republic of Ireland, Canada and New Zealand and actually tastes different due to this; Belgians often refer to this version as being dishwater. Stella Artois is one of the prominent brands of Anheuser-Busch InBev, the world’s largest brewer.

Tintin at the Vancouver Expo of 1986

Last week you were able to see some pictures Bob De Moor took when Johannes Stawowy stayed at the Studios Hergé back in 1986. On two of these pictures you were able to see the not so well known poster and sticker created for the Belgian pavilion at the Vancouver Expo of 1986. Today we’ll take a close look at that item since it was completely drawn by Bob De Moor in 1986.

The official poster for the Belgian pavilion at the Vancouver Expo 1986 as drawn by Bob De Moor. Copyright © Hergé / Moulinsart
The official poster for the Belgian pavilion at the Vancouver Expo 1986 as drawn by Bob De Moor. Copyright © Hergé / Moulinsart

For the 1986 Expo Belgium decided to go for the transportation theme and they really took it to heart by naming Tintin “the first man on the moon”. A life sized model of Tintin welcomed guests to the pavilion from the moon’s surface, a picture you can also see in the poster we are commenting today. The poster is – as far as the greeting Tintin characters are concerned – based on the 1969 drawing Bob De Moor made for the Studios Hergé when Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon. We say ‘based’ because there are quite some differences to be noted with the first version from 1969.

The 1986 poster holds the following differences:

  • The eyes of Tintin, Professor Calculus, Captain Haddock and Snowy have been moved more to the left (so that they look into the eyes of the visitors and not in the eyes of Neil Armstrong). You could wonder why Bob De Moor didn’t completely redrew the scene putting the 4 Tintin characters in front.
  • Tintin is holding the sign up in the Expo ’86 poster (in his right hand) and not Captain Haddock. As a result both Tintin‘s right hand and Captain Haddock‘s left hand have been redrawn.
  • Also Professor Calculus sees his left hand redrawn as he is no longer holding flowers.
  • The crater close to Neil Armstrong was drawn completely in the 1986 version as was the mountain which Armstrong was blocking.
  • The earth has been put lower so that it fits in the drawing.
The sticker for the Belgian pavilion at the Vancouver Expo 1986. Copyright © Hergé / Moulinsart
The sticker for the Belgian pavilion at the Vancouver Expo 1986. Copyright © Hergé / Moulinsart

The stickers created for the event didn’t all use the same changes. As you can see Professor Calculus again sees his left hand redrawn as he is no longer holding flowers but you can see that neither Tintin or Captain Haddock are holding up a sign. As a result Captain Haddock‘s left hand was also redrawn. The most noticeable difference with the poster are the eyes and the text balloon saying “Meet Tintin and Snowy at the Belgian pavilion.”

Back to the poster which also depicts the Belgian pavilion, as drawn by Bob De Moor. If you look well, all of the windows in the pavilion hold Tintin and parts of Hergé‘s moon rocket. As we all know De Moor was responsible for drawing the scaffolding as presented in Tintin albums, and we are pretty sure that he must have had the same feeling when having to draw the Belgian pavilion…

In a reaction Pierre Gay , the last cartoonist ever to be hired by Studios Hergé, confirms that he also collaborated on the poster: “I had forgotten this drawing, looking well now, I think I did the inking of the background — I always had that problem that my straight lines were somewhat shaky… Generally for this kind of work Bob made a very detailed sketch then I detailed it further, and depending on the difficulty or the importance of the project he inked the drawing himself or let me do it. Bob inked all the characters. I notice that I did the ‘E’, it’s slightly imperfect. Bob would have rounded it perfectly… but I was very young back then! Haha!”

The Belgian pavilion at the Vancouver Expo1986. Source: Wikipedia.
The Belgian pavilion at the Vancouver Expo1986. Source: Wikipedia.

Talking of the pavilion, in the main exhibit area, a sophisticated, working model of Antwerp‘s harbour was displayed complete with robotic cranes and ships. Also displayed was the Belgian canal system linking several seaports as well as innovations in urban transit. In the middle of it all, visitors could view a model of Europe’s first train. A 28 screen video presentation focused on transportation and culture. It also explained why Belgium is the only country on earth that could be seen from space as in the past Belgium had the lights on all night along its motorways. Since the crisis that is no longer the reality due to austerity measures.

We’ll be updating this article as we are awaiting some extra information. Also if you have a better scan of this poster, please let us know.

This is where Bob De Moor worked at the Studios Hergé (The Johannes Stawowy archives – Part 2)

A few days ago we offered you an insight into Bob De Moor’s trip to Mülheim in 1986 to represent the Studios Hergé and to explain how he worked. This was possible thanks to the archives of Johannes Stawowy. Today these archives take us to Brussels in 1986, more precisely to the Studios Hergé based at the Avenue Louise 162 (side-note, that same year they would be renamed Fondation Hergé). And surprise, for once Bob De Moor is the man behind the camera.

The name plate holding Alexis Remi and Bob de Moor.
The name plate holding Alexis Remi and Bob de Moor.

Johannes stayed 6 weeks at the Studios Hergé in July/August 1986 mainly to bring some order into the archives. In one photo we received you can see Johannes standing in front of the door of Bob De Moor‘s office. We enlarged a detail and the name plate  on the door still said Alexis Remi and Bob de Moor although Hergé‘s father had died in 1970, 88 years old.

Johannes Stawowy standing in front of Bob De Moor's office door, notice the painting on the left. Worth millions now.
Johannes Stawowy standing in front of Bob De Moor’s office door, notice the painting on the left. Worth millions now.

In another photograph we see Johannes standing a bit shy next to said door: “I was pretty shy if you look back at these pictures, just being ironic. You can also see the original 1935 painting from the “The Blue Lotus” album on the left of me, I should have taken it with me, hehe!” In the same picture you can see the poster which Bob De Moor made for the Belgian pavilion at the Vancouver’s Expo of 1986. We’ll be talking about this poster in tomorrow’s news. The sticker which was also produced by the Studios Hergé for the Vancouver’s Expo of 1986 can be seen in the 3rd picture where Johannes sits at Bob De Moor‘s desk.

Johannes Stawowy sitting at Bob De Moor's desk - picture 1.
Johannes Stawowy sitting at Bob De Moor’s desk – picture 1.

It was Bob De Moor directing the photos, that’s why he asked Johannes to sit down at his own desk. In the picture on the left you can see the mirror which was often used in gags by Bob De Moor when he drew a cartoon of himself.  You can also see a National Geographic issue and some Kuifje magazines. You can also notice the BP sticker Bob De Moor created featuring Thomson and Thompson. The big drawing on the wall will surely remind some of our readers of a drawing Bob De Moor made. Was it used as a reference?

Johannes Stawowy sitting at Bob De Moor's desk - picture 2.
Johannes Stawowy sitting at Bob De Moor’s desk – picture 2.

The next pictures gives another view on Bob De Moor‘s desk. It is filled with material including a picture/photocopy of a boat, which he was probably using to work on Cori’s “L’Expédition Maudite” which would be published in 1987. You also see a storyboard of one of the Fruit D’Or adverts produced in the 1970s and 1980s (on the right of the boat picture – and yes you will need to turn the picture 180 degrees and watch closely). It’s not clear which storyboard it is. Note the Citroën calendar on the wall behind Johannes as created by Bob De Moor for the Studios Hergé.

The Johannes Stawowy archives provide us with a very rare insight as they show images and material which never reached the big public. As a result we’ll be publishing several more articles based on the material that Johannes kept in his vaults for all these years.