Tag Archives: Jeanne De Belder

A house in De Kempen – undated drawing by Bob De Moor

During the Christmas period following Bob De Moor‘s death in 1992, his wife Jeanne De Belder sent out a Christmas Card with a drawing De Moor had made in the late 50ies / early 60ies. It’s was Luc De Meulenaere who tipped me off on this particular card. While cruising through the archives of the family De Moor one drawing caught my attention, it was the original of the card!

The original drawing by Bob De Moor, notice the grey colours.
The original drawing by Bob De Moor, notice the grey colours.

Something that is quite visible when you compare the print version and the final version is the greys used in the original drawing which disappeared in the printed card version, a pity because it gives the original an extra dimension, especially the night sky.

The drawing which could be found on a Christmas card Jeanne de Belder sent out in 1992.
The drawing which could be found on a Christmas card Jeanne de Belder sent out in 1992.

On the right of the drawing you can see a penciled message reading “Ki n° 47 page 26” and under that “<- 9 cm ->”. It could be that “Ki” (or is it a badly written “Kj”?), stands for ‘Kuifje’. Since we don’t have all the Flemish Tintin issues we can’t check if that drawing is indeed in one of the number 47s made between 1954 and let’s say 1965. If anyone has these issues, feel free to let us know!

The drawings depicts a scene which could have come straight from one of those lovely Robert & Bertrand albums by Willy Vandersteen (although that series only started in 1973). You see an older man (with a beard) reading a book whilst sitting in the entrance of his house.

Diving back in history, the house has a big resemblance with the houses you could find in De Kempen, a region in Belgium and the Netherlands, also called Kempenland or Campine in English, in late 1800, early 1900. Another clue is the Scots pine you see on the right which is a typical tree you can find in De Kempen due to the sandy soil.

A picture which was published in the book "Mijn land in de kering 1830-1980. Deel 1: Een ouderwetse wereld 1830-1914" (2008) by Karel Van Isacker.
A picture which was published in the book “Mijn land in de kering 1830-1980. Deel 1: Een ouderwetse wereld 1830-1914” (2008) by Karel Van Isacker.

And that I’m probably not far away from the truth shows this picture on the left, which I coincidentally found in a book by Karel van Isacker (not family of me, though he was a professor of my twin brother – also named Karel Van Isacker). The book “Mijn land in de kering 1830-1980. Deel 1: Een ouderwetse wereld 1830-1914” (2008) gives an idea how people lived between 1830 and 1914. And that very picture dates from 1900 from a family living in De Kempen in Belgium.

If anyone has a clue where the drawing was used for in the end, please send an email to bernard.vanisacker@gmail.com .

Bob De Moor in Welkenraedt for ‘Tout Hergé’ in 1991

In 1991 the Belgian village of Welkenraedt was the decor for the “Tout Hergé” exhibition which lasted 3 months (from June 8 till September 15). It was the biggest exhibition on Hergé and his work held so far. Johannes Stawowy, from whom we have already received lots of material on Bob De Moor, sent us a few pictures today when he visited the opening night of the exhibition. Of course he met up with Bob De Moor.

Johannes Stawowy and Bob De Moor in Welckenraedt in 1991. You can see Bob De Moor's wife Jeanne De Belder sitting on the right. Guy Decissy can be seen on the far left.
Johannes Stawowy and Bob De Moor in Welckenraedt in 1991. You can see Bob De Moor’s wife Jeanne De Belder sitting on the right. Guy Decissy can be seen on the far left.

Today we present you some pictures taken in 1991 at the Welkenraedt Exhibition. You’ll recognise several people which have been part of the Tintinosphere for a long time, such as Zhang Chongren (on whom Hergé based the Chang character which was introduced in the album “The Blue Lotus”), Guy Decissy and of course Bob de Moor (and his wife Jeanne De Belder).

Here are some more pictures.

Johannes Stawowy and Bob De Moor in Welckenraedt in 1991.
Johannes Stawowy and Bob De Moor in Welckenraedt in 1991.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Also Zhang Chongren was present in Welckenraedt.
Also Zhang Chongren was present in Welckenraedt.

The genesis of the cult car Citroen traction avant 22 model drawing by Bob De Moor (part 3)

In the past few months we dedicated 2 articles to the cover drawing which Bob De Moor completed in August 1992 for the 1994 publication “La 22, Enquête sur une mystérieuse Citroën”. The book, written by Hervé Laronde and Fabien Sabatès and published via the French publisher Rétroviseur, features the very last drawing Bob De Moor would complete before succumbing to cancer in August 1992. That this is indeed the last drawing he would make had been confirmed by De Moor’s wife Jeanne De Belder.

The drawing as pencilled by Geert De Sutter
The drawing as pencilled by Geert De Sutter

A few days ago Geert De Sutter, who has assisted Bob De Moor on several (new and re-published) albums, sent us a scan of the pencil drawing of this cover and he also told us how Bob De Moor and he worked together to complete this cover artwork. Bob De Moor made a rough sketch of what he wanted on the cover after which Geert De Sutter started drawing the actual cover.

It was however Bob De Moor himself who inked the drawing and as it seems he didn’t change any detail during this procedure as Geert De Sutter also confirms (see also page 386 of the Bob De Moor biography by Ronald Grossey where this particular drawing has been referenced).

The documentation of Bob De Moor for the Citroën cover.
The documentation of Bob De Moor for the Citroën cover.

Geert also provided us with a scan of the documentation which Bob De Moor had sent him in order to draw the Citroën. You can see this original reference material on the left. You’ll notice that the original source material used was quite old (it was a very old model after all).

With this 3rd article we have been able to show you the complete genesis of this particular Citroën drawing. We have several other such examples which will show you bit by bit. Thanks to Geert De Sutter for the material provided.