Tag Archives: Belvision

A ‘Tintin and the Lake of Sharks’ poster redrawn by Bob De Moor

When “Tintin and the Lake of Sharks” (French: “Tintin et le lac aux requins”) animation film was released in December 1972 by Belvision on a scenario by Greg (Michel Regnier), Belvision put a lot of effort in promoting the film the best they could. Apart from the well known film poster (also designed by Bob De Moor) several other promotional / merchandising items were created. Today we’ll show you a a poster (70 x 100 cm) which was designed by Bob De Moor and published by Belvision in 1973. It’s quite a rare item.

The "Tintin and the Lake of Sharks" poster as published by Belvision in 1973.
The “Tintin and the Lake of Sharks” poster as published by Belvision in 1973.

The item was used for the Belgian market, hence the bilingual Tintin/Kuifje heading, and seems to have been used . It depicts several scenes from the film (without the background), but the scenes were re-drawn by Bob De Moor. This happened possibly because none of the fragments depicted are shown in their entirety in the album version. So unlike what many seem to think, these drawings were not the ones as used in the final version nor in the magazine/newspaper versions we have commented on in the past. It suffices to take for instance the 2 thieves entering the Oceanographic Museum in Brussels or the Thomson and Thompson falling over the golf balls to notice that these drawings are quite different from the album versions. For a collector this poster is therefor quite an interesting find.

We don’t have a copy of this poster, if you have one, let us know.

Tomorrow we will take a first dive into the archives of the family De Moor with a find that we didn’t expect at all.

Bob the (decor) builder in ‘Tintin and the Temple of the Sun’

A while back we posted an article regarding the small Tintin promotional animation film Bob De Moor worked on for the Société Générale in 1969. Bob De Moor drew the decors in pencil while Claude Lambert would color them. Bob De Moor and Claude Lambert would also work on another movie, the “Tintin et le temple du soleil” (English: “Tintin and the Temple of the Sun”) also released in 1969. Lambert would be supervising that part as can also seen in the opening credits for the animation film. Other people who worked on the decors included Roger Flament, Jean Torton and Michou Wiggers.

Bob De Moor is mentioned in the opening credits for the animation film.
Bob De Moor is mentioned in the opening credits for the animation film.

Note that a remastered version is available on Amazon.

Bob De Moor‘s work would not be limited to just drawing the decors of the film in pencil. An album was also released via Casterman holding scenes from the film and it was Bob De Moor who took care of adding Tintin and co on the decors (a bit like what happened with “Tintin and the Lake of Sharks”). But more on that later on when we take a closer look at this album which never saw a reprint and is not always easy to find (in case you are still searching for a copy).

If you look back at it, you’ll see that the animation in this film looks outdated, but nevertheless  it must be said that there are some really well-worked out decors throughout the film.

One of the decors Bob De Moor worked on.
One of the decors Bob De Moor worked on.

For Belvision it would be their 5th long animation film. The year before they had launched “Astérix & Cleopatra” which was a real success, not in the least because this time it was co-realized by René Goscinny and Albert Uderzo unlike the 1967 film “Asterix the Gaule”.

Another example of a decor Bob De Moor worked on.
Another example of a decor Bob De Moor worked on.

The “Tintin et le temple du soleil” film was a co-production between Belgium, France and Switzerland and merged the Tintin albums “The Seven Crystal Balls” and “Prisoners of the Sun”. Although there had been a first long animation film of Tintin before (“The Calculus Affair” by Ray Goossens in 1964 which was totally based on the TV-series Belvision had produced), “Tintin et le temple du soleil” is considered to be the very first real long Tintin animation film intended for cinema use.

Based on a scenario by Greg, many scenes from the 2 books were deleted and events were changed and some were added. The first book was condensed into the first 15 minutes of the film and their was the extra role for the Great Inca’s daughter next to Zorrino. You’ll also notice that Thomson and Thompson accompany Tintin and Captain Haddock in the film on their quest to rescue Calculus. In the book they keep on looking for Tintin and his friends, even on the South Pole.

A mega-rare decor for Belvision’s “King Ottokar’s Sceptre” 1957 animation by Bob De Moor

Between 1955 and 1958 Raymond Leblanc‘s Belvision studios worked on several animation adaptations of some of Willy Vandersteen‘s Spike and Suzy albums (that’s English for’Suske en Wiske’ for those wondering) for the Flemish television NIR. Included were “Het Spaanse spook” (“The Spanish Spook”), “De bronzen sleutel” (“The Bronze Key”), “De gezanten van Mars” (“The Martian Ambassadors”) – of which an excerpt in Dutch can be watched below – and so on. If you’d watch those animation films you surely would notice that the animation was very rudimentary. It was a far cry from what American and Japanese studios were producing at that time. Then again, both Jos Marissen and Karel Van Milleghem – the only 2 people working on those animations at Belvision at that time – had never made animation films before. It would only be after the arrival of Flemish animation pioneer Ray Goossens (and old colleague of Bob De Moor at the AFIM studios remember) that Belvision would really grasp the technique.

Here’s a part of the Dutch spoken animation version of “De gezanten van Mars” by Belvision as made in 1956.

Despite its shortcomings the series proved to be successful in Flanders and Leblanc started dreaming…

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Tintin goes SGM with Bob De Moor on decors

SGM booklet page 49. Decor by Bob De Moor, and probably Snowy and Tintin (in jeans!) too.
SGM booklet page 49. Decor by Bob De Moor, and probably Snowy and Tintin (in jeans!) too.

In 1969 Belvision was asked to create a small Tintin promotional animation film for Société Générale, a French multinational banking and financial services company headquartered in Paris, and more precisely for the Société Générale des Minerais (SGM). This company specialized in the transport of metals in Congo. Congo was at that time already decolonized (since 1960) and being pillaged by Colonel Joseph-Désiré Mobutu (aka Mobutu Sese Seko) who amassed over 4 billion dollar during that time, as much as the total debt the country had.

Decor design penciled by Bob De Moor.
Decor design penciled by Bob De Moor.

The 7 minutes 45 seconds animation short saw several people collaborating on it: Greg completed the (rather naive) scenario, Nic Broca designed the storyboard while the Studios Hergé created the model sheets. Bob De Moor was asked to draw the decors in pencil while Claude Lambert would color them. Lambert would also work on the “Tintin and the Temple of the Sun” also released in 1969 just like Broca.

Decor drawn by Bob De Moor and colored by Claude Lambert.
Decor drawn by Bob De Moor and colored by Claude Lambert.

The film would be produced on just a few 35mm color (and super 8 mm?) copies, and as you will notice, the available material on the net is not really excellent as far as viewing quality goes (see below).

You’ll also notice Tintin for the very first time in jeans (!), something we would see again in the “Tintin and the Picaros” album completed and released a few years later.

SGM booklet page 10, decor by Bob De Moor.
SGM booklet page 10, decor by Bob De Moor.

From this animation also a 50 page booklet (if you also count the frontpages) in small format (10 x 11 cm) would be produced in 1970 by Editions Publiart having one frame per page with text written underneath it. In the example on the left you see page 10 of the booklet. Note that the character drawings used for these frames were not always the same as in the actually animation short. Not that this is odd, in the end the same changes would be seen for the albums made from the animation films “Tintin and the Temple of the Sun” (1969) and “Tintin and The Lake Of Sharks” (1972).

It’s unclear who made the drawings in this booklet, but the quality differs from frame to frame with page 42 and 49 showing frames that look like they might have been adapted by Bob De Moor. If you are able picking up the booklet from an auction or flee market, don’t hesitate, it’s a rare gem which hides more than just a silly SGM story. Let us also hope that a good copy of the animation itself will pop up soon.

To discover more on this project, make sure to get, BELVISION – “Le Hollywood européen du dessin animé”, the book has a lot of visuals on the projects involving Bob De Moor and is a must-have in your collection.

2 different versions of Fruit d’or advert featuring Professor Calculus

Advert featuring peasant woman - Copyright © Hergé / Moulinsart
Advert featuring peasant woman – Copyright © Hergé / Moulinsart

In the series of Fruit d’Or adverts which Bob De Moor completed for Publiart/Studios Hergé, today let’s check out one particular advert featuring Professor Calculus hovering in the air with a hamper of poultry in his left hand and a Fruit d’Or margarine/a cooking butter boat in his right hand (from the perspective of the professor, that is).

There is a housewife in this version - Copyright © Hergé / Moulinsart
There is a housewife in this version – Copyright © Hergé / Moulinsart

The second advert can be seen here on the left. You notice a lot of differences between the two drawings, although on the first sight they seem very similar.

We unfortunately have no exact date as when or in which magazine these ads were found. In case you have these adverts on print, please contact us.

To give you a first clue, check these 2 videos and pay attention to the woman…


Fruit d’Or Huile de Tournesol Le jogging by jrmdlvx


Fruit d’Or Huile de tournesol by jrmdlvx

So, let’s dig a bit deeper into the differences of the drawings. We’ll take the margarine version as a starting point and list all the differences:

  • the basket with poultry that Professor Calculus is holding in this version has 2 extra animals: a pigeon and a duck,
  • the margarine boat is drawn in this version,
  • there are extra movement lines under the head of Professor Calculus, under his elbow and under both his feet,
  • you also see the extra movement lines around the poultry and the basket itself,
  • an extra duck is added on the left of the already present goose,
  • the bushes on the left of the professor are bigger,
  • the colds are more evenly spread removing the bigger cloud behind the the professor and adding a few smaller ones,
  • if you look at the house you’ll see and extra shutter on the ground floor window plus a few extra visible bricks in the wall,
  • the biggest change however is the housewife which in this version is a peasant wife with different clothing, different haircut and colour,
  • on the left of the peasant woman you see a prong stuck in a small dung hill,
  • overall there has been a different colouring done making this version more vivid. But better scans would help of course to see the complete difference.
Peasant woman as drawn by Bob De Moor for the Belvision team - Copyright © Hergé / Moulinsart
Peasant woman as drawn by Bob De Moor for the Belvision team – Copyright © Hergé / Moulinsart

It’s our guess, but we can be wrong, that the margarine version was the final version due to its more elaborated decors and drawings. However, it could also have been directed at different audiences. If we could nail a date on the TV spots we’d have a better idea. Sure thing is that the peasant woman was drawn for instance in 1983 (see the date on the drawing) by Bob De Moor for a character study by the Belvision team as you can see on the left.

More info later on…

Tintin & Snowy test drawing by Bob de Moor for Belvision’s ‘Tintin and the Lake of Sharks’

1972521_643221599060999_711293657_nThis Tintin & Snowy drawing was completed by Bob de Moor in 1972 for the Studios Hergé. Of course it was made for the “Kuifje en het Haaienmeer” (that’s the dutch title – so you also get to learn Bob’s language bit by bit ) as produced by the Belvision studios. Note again that the different drawing is due to the purpose of the drawing: to serve as a guideline for the animators at the Belvision studios. Another test drawing for a dog can be seen here. That’s also why Snowy has a more human mouth for instance (which you also saw in the very early Belvision animated series of Tintin).

For those interested to know how Bob de Moor worked on this and other Tintin animated films, make sure to read Monographie BELVISION – tome 0 – Monographie Belvision – “Le Hollywood européen du dessin animé”, it holds a lot of extra artwork and information.

“Tintin and the Lake of Sharks” (French: “Tintin et le lac aux requins”) was directed by Raymond Leblanc and written by the Belgian comics creator Greg (Michel Regnier). Bob de Moor supervised the film for the Studios Hergé. Note that this isn’t the first time that Greg wrote a scenario for Hergé. Earlier on he had written the scenario for the abandoned Tintin album “Thermozéro” which might now be released after all so it seems.

Bob de Moor test drawing for Tintin and Snowy animated film “Tintin and the Lake of Sharks”

10155253_643225342393958_1853556247_nWe unearthed this test drawing by Bob de Moor for the Tintin story “Tintin and the Lake of Sharks”. The drawing was completed around 1972. Note that the different way of drawing is due to the purpose of the drawing: to serve as a guideline for the animators at the Belvision studios.

For those interested to know how Bob de Moor worked on this and other Tintin animated films, make sure to read Monographie BELVISION – tome 0 – Monographie Belvision – “Le Hollywood européen du dessin animé”, it holds a lot of extra artwork and information.

“Tintin and the Lake of Sharks” (French: “Tintin et le lac aux requins”) was directed by Raymond Leblanc and written by the Belgian comics creator Greg (Michel Regnier). Bob de Moor supervised the film for the Studios Hergé. Note that this isn’t the first time that Greg wrote a scenario for Hergé. Earlier on he had written the scenario for the abandoned Tintin album “Thermozéro” which might now be released after all so it seems.

An album would be published too from the film, albeit in different versions, including a black & white version for which de Moor actually drew the backgrounds as well instead of using just the celluloid backgrounds as is the case in the commercially available album.

Book on Belvision with lots of Bob de Moor info

51FvnwJ5+SL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_SX385_SY500_CR,0,0,385,500_SH20_OU08_Published in December 2013 this book is a must read for Bob de Moor fans. You’ll find crayon drawings by Bob for the decors of the Tintin SGM video/comic plus a lot more info on de Moor and his work for the Belvision studios.

Written by Daniel Couvreur in a rather tongue in cheek way – though it’s unclear whether this was intended – we have been laughing out loud throughout the reading of the chapter on the trouble the studios had to complete the Tintin animation series.

Bob de Moor is being portrayed in there as being the most reliable person. Which probably was also the case. Recommended reading – you can order the book right here!