Janneke en Stanneke, a 1948 series by Bob De Moor never published in album format (except for one story)

In 1948 en 1949 a new Bob De Moor (under the Artec Studios flag) series saw a publication: ‘Janneke en Stanneke’.

It was the weekly comic strip publication ‘t Kapoentje which published the different stories. ‘Stories’ because many people think that there is only one Janneke en Stanneke story, namely the one which in the end got re-published for the very first time in album format by Ciso Stripgids (via Brabantia Nostra) in 1989.

It’s not all that weird that many people are unaware of the other stories, because if you don’t get published, you easily get forgotten, and that is exactly what happened here.

Janneke en Stanneke, a 1948 series by Bob De Moor never published in album format (except for one story)

The stories got published in a weekly only and got forgotten over time by most people. However, if you paid attention when reading the 1989 publication, you could have seen that the 60-strips long story actually is the follow-up story to another Janneke and Stanneke story. It starts with a text reminding readers what happened just before.

Today we present you the strips 37, 38, 39 and 40 of an unpublished untitled story (in album format that is). Note that none of the Janneke en Stanneke stories actually had a title, which doesn’t really make it easier to know what you are looking at. The duo finds themselves in the company of indians this time.

Don’t look too much for a story, because the series is actually a collection of gas with a loose story woven into it, the same with the story published in album format. Nevertheless, it’s part of De Moor’s heritage and a very good way to see how Bob De Moor‘s technique improved over time.

In the page published today you can see that De Moor is still a bit clumsy as far as the structure of the page, strips and cases is concerned. There clearly was no plan when creating the story or the page in particular. Not surprising, that year he would complete at least 17 stories… so there was no time for much story development let alone a lot of preparation. Things had to move on, and fast because the contracts for new stories kept on pouring in at the Artec Studios.

You can also see that De Moor struggles when it comes to putting people in a position which is not just walking or standing still. Look at case 1 and 2 for instance where he clearly is not at ease with the way he has drawn things. Also the use of a black shadow in the first 2 cases is not well-done (he would excel in it later on in his career through).

Nevertheless, these are stories which definitely deserve a re-publication. We wouldn’t be surprised that the fine people at Brabantstrip will ‘attack’ this in the next months or years (hint hint hint!).

The lost 2nd part of the ‘De witte maw-maw’ album cover

In March 1999 a black and white version of the Snoe and Snolleke album “De Witte Maw-Maw” saw the light of day.

It was a collaboration between 3 comic strip festivals and the Brussels based Enigma publishing house and it seems they had really big plans keeping the Bob De Moor fans busy for quite some time collecting all the different parts, because yes, they had split up the album in 2 parts.

The second part was to be released on the Comic Festival of Ganshoren later that year, on may 15th, to be followed by 3 parts compiling “De Spaa-motor”.

Below the copy we have (thanks to Alain Demaret for giving this!).

de-witte-maw-maw-enigma

‘Was’ because alas, nothing materialised except for this first part. Why? We’re not sure, but we have contacted some people to get some more info on this.

Nevertheless, we know this, Johan De moor had drawn a cover for the first part and – and this many people don’t know – he also completed the 2nd cover artwork, which in fact together with part 1 composed one single drawing. We have known this for a while, but it was only when we stumbled on this blog post by the Brussels based comic store Het B-Gevaar that we discovered the 2nd part too.

de-witte-maw-maw-deel-1-2

de-witte-maw-maw-fenixAs you will see the cover artwork for the Fenix album version published in 2005 by Brabantstrip is quite different too from this 1999 version by Johan De Moor. Especially Snoe and Snolleke have been redrawn for the later version and added into the first cover, which creates a better balance. At the same time Johan De Moor gave them a more Bob De Moor style.

We’ll update this story when we get extra information.

Johan De Moor pays tribute to Bob De Moor’s Balthazar for the upcoming Comic Strip Festival in Brussels (02-04/09)

From September 2 through September 4 you can visit the Brussels Comic Strip Festival in the Brussels park.

The festival has been celebrating comics of all kinds in Brussels since 2010, and welcomes more than 100,000 visitors each year. Young or old, amateur or specialist, there is always something for everyone among the many activities on offer.

For the 2016 edition, the Brussels park will be hosting comic museums, dozens of publishing houses, exhibitions, book shops, comic sellers, conferences, workshops and hundreds of authors signings. The Brussels Comic Strip Festival also includes a night-time show at Brussels Park, the Balloon’s Day Parade, the Comic Strip Festival’s Rally, comic strip exhibitions and activities throughout the city.

From September 2 through September 4 you can visit the Brussels Comic Strip Festival in the Brussels park. The festival has been celebrating comics of all kinds in Brussels since 2010, and welcomes more than 100,000 visitors each year. Young or old, amateur or specialist, there is always something for everyone among the many activities on offer. For the 2016 edition, the Brussels park will be hosting comic museums, dozens of publishing houses, exhibitions, book shops, comic sellers, conferences, workshops and hundreds of authors signings. The Brussels Comic Strip Festival also includes a night-time show at Brussels Park, the Balloon's Day Parade, the Comic Strip Festival’s Rally, comic strip exhibitions and activities throughout the city. We have been there for the past few years and it's always a delight meeting authors, publishers and friends. For Bob De Moor fans, there is a big chance you'll be able to complete your collection there as there are always shops present which also cater to the more 'conservative' comic strip fans. But, let's get back to Bob De Moor, or more precisely his son Johan De Moor who has completed the official artwork for the Festival's posters. On the poster we not only Tintin, the Smurfs, Ric Hochet, Thorgal, the Chevalier Ardent, etc., but also Balthazar. I'm sure you will recognise a lot other characters including a reference to Willy Vandersteen ("De schat van Beersel"). We all know that especially Balthazar is one of Johan's favourite characters, so that doesn't come as a surprise. Quite a nice poster this one is!

We have been there for the past few years and it’s always a delight meeting authors, publishers and friends. For Bob De Moor fans, there is a big chance you’ll be able to complete your collection there as there are always shops present which also cater to the more ‘conservative’ comic strip fans.

From September 2 through September 4 you can visit the Brussels Comic Strip Festival in the Brussels park. The festival has been celebrating comics of all kinds in Brussels since 2010, and welcomes more than 100,000 visitors each year. Young or old, amateur or specialist, there is always something for everyone among the many activities on offer. For the 2016 edition, the Brussels park will be hosting comic museums, dozens of publishing houses, exhibitions, book shops, comic sellers, conferences, workshops and hundreds of authors signings. The Brussels Comic Strip Festival also includes a night-time show at Brussels Park, the Balloon's Day Parade, the Comic Strip Festival’s Rally, comic strip exhibitions and activities throughout the city. We have been there for the past few years and it's always a delight meeting authors, publishers and friends. For Bob De Moor fans, there is a big chance you'll be able to complete your collection there as there are always shops present which also cater to the more 'conservative' comic strip fans. But, let's get back to Bob De Moor, or more precisely his son Johan De Moor who has completed the official artwork for the Festival's posters. On the poster we not only Tintin, the Smurfs, Ric Hochet, Thorgal, the Chevalier Ardent, etc., but also Balthazar. I'm sure you will recognise a lot other characters including a reference to Willy Vandersteen ("De schat van Beersel"). We all know that especially Balthazar is one of Johan's favourite characters, so that doesn't come as a surprise. Quite a nice poster this one is!But, let’s get back to the subject of this article. Johan De Moor has completed the official artwork for the Festival’s posters (thanks to Alain Demaret for the info). On the poster we not only find the characters such as TintinSmurfette, Ric Hochet, Thorgal, the Chevalier Ardent, etc., but also Balthazar. Yep, that funny abstract character which De Moor developed in 1975. We all know that especially Balthazar is one of Johan’s favourite characters, so that doesn’t come as a surprise.

I’m sure you will recognise a lot other characters including a reference to Willy Vandersteen (“De schat van Beersel”). Quite a nice poster this one is!

The alternative version of Barelli’s ‘Bonne mine à la mer’ cover

Today’s article was triggered by a mail we got from Petja van den Hurk who pointed us towards this blogpost by Peter Velter on the Joost Swarte website.

The article recalled an aborted project from 1975 to unite a number of comics by well known underground authors in one album. But although the project never got realised, Velter did compile the works by Joost Swarte and Bob De Moor in a new book, “Blijf Kalm, Werk In Uitvoering”. The book (rather a magazine) itself is a quite limited edition and was only made available to people close to the project and the artists themselves (or their family in the case of Bob De Moor).

You can preview the book right here.

One drawing stood out and that’s an alternative cover for the Barelli album “Bonne mine à la mer”. There are a few things to say about the cover. First of all you will notice that De Moor already made a previous version on the same page and then placed a newer version on top – you can see the border right under the heading. A detail is also that De Moor had no idea yet what number the album would be in the Collection Vedette.  And significant is that the artwork was immediately in French (many people still think erroneously that De Moor first wrote his scripts etc. in Dutch).

bone-mine-a-la-mer

In 1975 Bob De Moor would see the “Bonne mine à la mer” album released via Le Lombard. It would be the only full album released so quickly after being published in the Tintin journal (n°6-14 1974). It was the follow-up album to the 1972 story “Barelli et le Bouddha boudant” and through 32 pages Barelli discovers the world of the radio pirates which often broadcasted from boats in the late seventies.

The alternative cover is based on page 17 of the album, more precisely case 7 and 8 as you can see below.

bonne-mine-a-la-mer

It shows Barelli’s yellow Alpine Renault almost falling off a cliff. The composition of this alternative cover looks quite dynamic with falling rocks etc. but perhaps it didn’t really represent enough the red line of the album, namely radio pirates. So in the end De Moor would go for the rubber boat heading towards a radio pirate boat.

The album was most recently re-issued by BD Must editions and is an absolute must for Tintin fans as you will recognise many scenes which will immediately show you what drawings Bob De Moor worked on for the Tintin albums around that time.