Tric goes fishing in 1951, slightly corrected by Johan De Moor in 2012

When Jean-Michel Boxus, boss of the Brussels based editor BD Must, started work on the reissue of the Monsieur Tric albums (available here), he also decided to include all of the Monsieur/Professeur Tric/Troc stories which never had been published before in album format. The stories concerned are the ones which never had been published as a one page story in Tintin. What followed was a lot of time going through each and every Tintin issue in order to get hold of each and every ‘missing’  Tric story. They would be added in volume 1 of the Monsieur Tric collection.

The story as published on the 2nd page of the Tintin of 17 February 1951.
The story as published on the 2nd page of the Tintin of 17 February 1951.

One of those stories, titled “Il faut savoir se borner” which can be freely translated as “You must learn to know when enough is enough”, has some extra information attached to it. Published on the 2nd page of the Tintin of 17 February 1951, the 3-case strip sees Tric out on a fishing trip which looks very successful in the first case. Too successful because his boat sinks in the 3rd and final case because of the huge amount of fish he has caught.

The cleaned out first case of the one-strip story.
The cleaned out first case of the one-strip story.

You can see that the first case is ‘incomplete’ because the Tintin Stamp was placed in the left bottom corner of the page – not by Bob De Moor, but probably by the same person who also added Snowy in this drawing (it is commonly believed that these “La classe sans maitre” drawings were the precursors to Professeur Tric since the Tric character would appear only a few weeks later). A Tintin Stamp in a Monsieur Tric album? That would have been a no go, so BD Must had to find a solution in order to get the story published.

The corrected corner, later melted with the cleaned out first case.
The corrected corner, later melted with the cleaned out first case.

Since the original drawing was lost, Jean-Michel Boxus asked Bob De Moor‘s son Johan De Moor to restore the drawing to what could have been its original version before it was printed in Tintin. As we all know, this isn’t the first time that Johan De Moor has been restoring drawings from his father in order to be published so the request was a very logical one. In case you missed it, for the last version of “De schele zilvervos” (dutch for”The squint-eyed silver fox”) out via Standaard Uitgeverij, Johan De Moor even completely redrew the cover.

On August 7, 2012, 3 days after the initial request was made, Johan De Moor sent the missing corner of the 1st case to BD Must. You can see the replacement on the left. The drawing was then placed in the cleaned out scan from the Professeur Tric strip and coloured with the rest of the cases.

Thanks to Jean-Michel Boxus for helping out with this article.

Snowy in an early 1950 Bob De Moor drawing. How did that happen?

On January 26 1950 Bob De Moor again got the chance to complete the frontpage of yet another Tintin magazine, Tintin N°4 of that year more precisely. The subject of the drawing was “La classe sans maitre”, a class where the teacher was nowhere to be seen, resulting in quite some mayhem. We all know that frontpage, at least I hope you do, but what many don’t know is that Bob De Moor also drew the drawing on page 2 illustrating Tintin’s editorial. We are going to take a closer look at that particular drawing today.

The drawing used to go with the editorial.
The drawing used to go with the editorial.

But first this, the idea for that particular chaotic frontcover was based on a real story, explained in the editorial by Tintin. In a Swiss school a teacher was unable to attend his class for 3 days due to family matters. On his desk he had left a letter explaining why he would be absent and also the request to behave. Surprisingly enough the kids did behave for 3 long days, reading and studying. The frontcover of Tintin represented the worst case scenario of course.

As we just said, a drawing was also placed above the editorial more or less giving a further insight in what could have been the worst case scenario. This was drawn by Bob De Moor although his signature is missing. We recognise several elements from the frontcover: a kid is throwing darts at the blackboard, there are kids playing cards, a paper plane is being thrown. There are also 3 other elements popping up which are missing in the frontcover: you see a pupil dancing with the skeleton which in the frontcover has donkey ears placed on its head, a kid is holding up a mask behind the desk of the teacher (not in the frontcover) and Snowy is passing by chewing on his trademark bone. Something is off though. As you can clearly see, the feet of Snowy don’t touch the ground and it looks like he has just been pasted in there quite rapidly.

The actual frontcover of Tintin issue 4, from January 26, 1950.
The actual frontcover of Tintin issue 4, from January 26, 1950.

It is very doubtful that either Bob De Moor or Hergé would make such an error (it looks way too clumsy). Also Bob De Moor would not have done this, because adding a character of Tintin in his own drawings that soon in his collaboration with Hergé would have meant a certain artistic suicide. So it’s our guess that a layout guy quickly pasted Tintin’s compagnon in there using a cut out copy of Snowy.

It’s also our guess that this editorial drawing was made before Bob De Moor started on the frontcover drawing. The first drawing just isn’t as detailed as the frontcover and you also see that the remaining  ideas which you also find back in the frontcover have been worked out even more in that frontcover.

Barelli in Madrid with Citroën and the Coconuts

As you all know, Citroën was a brand of cars which always have had a special place in the over of Bob De Moor. The Citroën cars pop up in almost every Barelli album plus he also made a special Citroën cover for the book “La 22, Enquête sur une mystérieuse Citroën” by Hervé Laronde and Fabien Sabatès published by Rétroviseur in 1994. And that wouldn’t be the only Bob De Moor related Citroën drawing which would hit the market around that time.

Barely in Madrid with Citroën and the Coconuts
Barely in Madrid with Citroën and the Coconuts

For the 1994 Citroën calendar, the car producer (via Le Lombard) had asked Johan De Moor to offer a drawing for the June page. The idea was that each comic author would make a drawing representing a Citroën car placed in one of the most beautiful lanes the world had on offer at that time. The text on the front of the calendar was “En 1994, tous les chemins ne mènent pas à Rome. Cette année, Citroën défile sur les plus belles avenues du monde” (freely translated as: In 1994 not all roads lead to Rome. This year Citroën passes through the most beautiful lanes in the world.).

Back to Johan De Moor. The son of Bob De Moor found no better way than to create a drawing featuring not only Barelli driving a Citroën AX on the Gran Via in Madrid, but also the famous spy trio The Coconuts (from the Barelli album “The secret agents”) offering a ‘devilish’ soundtrack as the text underneath the drawing explains.

Johan De Moor signed with this put below his signature: (Bob De Moor Inv.). We tried getting Johan on the line tonight for the meaning of that ‘Inv.’ but he was unreachable, we’ll update when we get hold of him :).

Bob De Moor’s ‘Le Lion des Flandres’ / ‘De Leeuw van Vlaanderen’ restored – soon out via BD Must

A few days ago we showed you a first glimpse on the work done by BD Must for the re-release of the Flandres Trilogy by Bob De Moor which consists of the 3 albums “Le Lion des Flandres” (“De Leeuw van Vlaanderen”), “Les gars de Flandre” (“De Kerels van Vlaanderen”) and “Conrad le Hardi” (“Sterke Jan”). We then showed you a first glimpse on the restoration for one of these albums, namely “Conrad le Hardi”.

The restored version - work in progress - of "De Leeuw van Vlaanderen".
The restored version – work in progress – of “De Leeuw van Vlaanderen”.

Today we can exclusively show you the work in progress on the cover artwork for the “Le Lion des Flandres”. Again, the colours have completely been redone, and the cover is based on the De Dageraad version from 1984. BD Must tried getting hold of the original version but they couldn’t get hold of a document holding enough quality to restore it and re-color it.

The cover we show here is still work in progress as BD Must has not completely finalised the color choice for each element in the drawing. Stay tuned for more updates!

Exclusive glimpse on the upcoming re-publication of the Flandres Trilogy

When we interviewed Jean-Michel Boxus from BD Must in April 2014 he told us that he – amongst other things Bob De Moor related – planned to re-release the Flandres Trilogy which consists of the 3 albums “Le Lion des Flandres”, “Les gars de Flandre” and “Conrad le Hardi”. Today we received a first look on the restoration for one of these albums, namely “Conrad le Hardi” (“Sterke Jan” in Dutch).

As you can see below, the colours have completely been redone. The cover of the album refers to the Bédéscope version, but again with a different new colouring. A release date is not known yet but it will be pretty soon. The 3 albums will be released in one go.

Enjoy page 1 of the album plus the cover.

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conrad-le-hardi-cover

 

 

Bob De Moor in Welkenraedt for ‘Tout Hergé’ in 1991

In 1991 the Belgian village of Welkenraedt was the decor for the “Tout Hergé” exhibition which lasted 3 months (from June 8 till September 15). It was the biggest exhibition on Hergé and his work held so far. Johannes Stawowy, from whom we have already received lots of material on Bob De Moor, sent us a few pictures today when he visited the opening night of the exhibition. Of course he met up with Bob De Moor.

Johannes Stawowy and Bob De Moor in Welckenraedt in 1991. You can see Bob De Moor's wife Jeanne De Belder sitting on the right. Guy Decissy can be seen on the far left.
Johannes Stawowy and Bob De Moor in Welckenraedt in 1991. You can see Bob De Moor’s wife Jeanne De Belder sitting on the right. Guy Decissy can be seen on the far left.

Today we present you some pictures taken in 1991 at the Welkenraedt Exhibition. You’ll recognise several people which have been part of the Tintinosphere for a long time, such as Zhang Chongren (on whom Hergé based the Chang character which was introduced in the album “The Blue Lotus”), Guy Decissy and of course Bob de Moor (and his wife Jeanne De Belder).

Here are some more pictures.

Johannes Stawowy and Bob De Moor in Welckenraedt in 1991.
Johannes Stawowy and Bob De Moor in Welckenraedt in 1991.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Also Zhang Chongren was present in Welckenraedt.
Also Zhang Chongren was present in Welckenraedt.

Cori sketch for the ‘L’Expédition Maudite’ album from 1987

Over the past few months we only had a few Cori related posts. In the next days we are going to change this and give you an insight on how Bob De Moor worked to create this excellent series.

Cori as sketched by Bob De Moor.
Cori as sketched by Bob De Moor.

Today we present you a sketch of Cori which Bob De Moor created for the “L’Expédition Maudite” album (1987). It’s one of many character sketches which De Moor created whilst preparing this album. If you look well you can see the helplines which he used to proportion Cori‘s body correctly. Layer after layer Cori becomes a real living character.

The Cori le Moussaillon (Cori the Cabin Boy in English, Cori De Scheepsjongen in Dutch) series ran from 1951 until 1993 and counted 5 albums (6 actually, since the first album got redrawn and altered for a later publication to match the style in the newly created albums). It’s quite sure that De Moor based the series on the 1945 series Bart le Moussaillon (Bart de Scheepsjongen) which he created for KZV (Kleine Zondagsvriend). We will presenting you some scans of this series in the next weeks.

The complete 5 album collection of Cori le moussaillon by Bob de Moor has been published by BD Must.