The Le Petit Orgue cartoon cut and paste for Johan De Moor’s 1989’s Bronzen Adhemar prize

Yesterday you could read a post on a special Le Petit Orgue cartoon which Bob De Moor created for the 10th anniversary of the vocal ensemble, which lasted from the 70s till the 90s, and which had among its members Bob De Moor‘s son in law Luc De Meulenaere and several sons of Bob De Moor himself: Chris De Moor, Dirk De Moor, Stefaan De Moor.

The adapted version in the press folder published by De Warande.
The adapted version in the press folder published by De Warande.

But we were pretty sure we had seen that drawing before, so we started digging in the archives and found the (altered) cartoon back in a 1989 press folder which was created for the Stripgidsdagen at De Warande in Turnhout, Flanders. It more precisely announced an upcoming exhibition of Bob De Moor‘s work plus it also announced that Johan De Moor had won the 1989 Bronzen Adhemar (formerly known as the ‘Stripgidsprijs’) for his Kasper series.

Inside the press folder we found a sheet of paper which held the cartoon, albeit in an adapted version. The print quality of the folder was not the best to start with so we can only show you the cartoon in the state it was published. Johan De Moor – who has just completed some new ‘Kobe De Koe’ pages for an epilogue – confirmed our suspicion that it wasn’t Bob De Moor who adapted the original cartoon.

You’ll see that the texts got changed to fit it for Johan De Moor‘s prize (the ‘Le Petit Orgue’ in the fold out that Dirk De Moor holds was however not replaced, probably forgotten) and that the head of Daniel Collette was replaced with the head of Bob De Moor.

Le Petit Orgue celebrates its 10th anniversary with Bob De Moor

Especially for the occasion of the 10th anniversary of the Le Petit Orgue Bob De Moor made a cartoon. Le Petit Orgue was a vocal ensemble, which lasted from the 70s till the 90s, and it had among its members Bob De Moor‘s son in law Luc De Meulenaere and several sons of Bob De Moor himself: Chris De Moor, Dirk De Moor, Stefaan De Moor. But let’s have a closer look.

Le Petit Orgue celebrates its 10th anniversary with Bob De Moor in 1984.
Le Petit Orgue celebrates its 10th anniversary with Bob De Moor in 1984.

The cartoon, made in 1984, holds 13 characters (plus Bob De Moor throwing in a bomb which is about to explode anytime). The 3rd person from the left is Luc De Meulenaere (you can recognise him from the various other drawings which De Moor made of him over the time) and thanks to a post by Xavier Fourneau on Facebook we can identify several people on this cartoon (the identification was done by Luc De Meulenaere). The complete line-up from the left to the right is: Alain Bardiaux, Alain Caucheteux, Luc De Meulenaere, Daniel Collette, Luk Deurinck, Yves Goffinet, Claude Meiresonne, Benoît Pitsaer, Christian Dufour, Peter Van Alen, Xavier Fourneau, Bernard Bolsaie, Dirk De Moor and a maimed right hand of Bob De Moor (it’s missing 2 fingers) throwing the bomb.

But something is off, it was Bob De Moor‘s left hand which got maimed during World War 2, so why is his right hand maimed on this drawing? Possibly De Moor decided that he had to roll a bomb from the right, which could only be an open right hand. But to put his trademark, he decided to maim the hand on purpose.

It would be interesting to get some of the 13 members together for a brand new picture…

The windmill by Bob De Moor, 1947

In the past few months we have described several paintings which Bob De Moor painted in 1947 such as the smoking kid, a still life and a winter landscape. Today we show you a watercolour painting which we discovered in the archives of Ludo Van Looveren, a nephew of Bob De Moor, and son of John Van Looveren (Artec Studios). The painting represents a wooden windmill and both the signature (it’s identical to 1947 paintings which had a signature and date added) and colour use put this painting in 1947.

The wooden windmill by Bob De Moor
The wooden windmill by Bob De Moor

Although this is not exactly the best painting which Bob De Moor made, it showcases how the then 22-year old Bob De Moor is testing his craftsmanship. Unlike the winter landscape painting which he carefully completed, this windmill painting looks more like hasty work. You can for instance clearly see the original pencil drawings and a not so meticulous colouring of the whole. However, as a time document this painting certainly has its merits.

In the next days we will also present you yet another painting which a private collector reported to us just a few days ago.

Bob De Moor’s Monsieur Tric/Troc featured in the book ‘Les archives Goscinny : Le journal Tintin, 1956-1961’

In June 1998 the French editor Vents d’Ouest released the first volume in a series which would unlock the René Goscinny archives: “Les archives Goscinny : Le journal Tintin, 1956-1961”. As the title explains the book gives you an insight in the work Goscinny did for the Tintin Journal in the period 1956-1961. As many know Goscinny also worked on the scenarios for Monsieur Tric/Troc, but not many know this book, so let’s show you what you are missing…

Cover of the book "Les archives Goscinny : Le journal Tintin, 1956-1961".
Cover of the book “Les archives Goscinny : Le journal Tintin, 1956-1961”.

First of all, René Goscinny was an extremely busy bee when it comes to writing gag loaded scenarios. Next to Bob De Moor‘s Monsieur Tric/Troc (for which he created 9 gags), Goscinny also created scenarios for Oumpah Pah, Spaghetti & Strapontin, Modeste & Pompon  for the weekly thus providing work for such comic artists as Uderzo, Tibet and many other collaborators (Angenot, Jo-El Azara, Bissot, Weinberg, Craenhals, Coutant). And for many of these stories this book represents the first ever publication in book format. Interesting for Bob De Moor fans is that the book holds all the stories in their original Tintin Journal colouring which gives you that good authentic feeling (full colour, black and white, black and white with red as supporting colour).

The scenario for "Monsieur Tric et le Canari".
The scenario for “Monsieur Tric et le Canari”.

The reproductions of the original Bob De Moor pages in the book are preceded by a scanned document (see the left image), the first page of a scenario which Goscinny completed for the “Monsieur Tric et le Canari” gag which was published in the Belgian Tintin Journal n° 34/58 from 20 August 1958. It would be the last scenario he wrote for Bob De Moor. The document shows how well-prepared the scenarios were which he delivered to the comic authors. For the “Monsieur Tric et le Canari” as shown in this book he describes very well what happens in each frame so that Bob De Moor only needed to worry about the drawing.

A glimpse of the original versions as they appear in the book.
A glimpse of the original versions as they appear in the book.

In short, if you don’t have this french language book in your collection, then it’s high time to get it! The 122 pages book comes in a hardcover and is available for only 14,50 € from Amazon France. The other volumes can also be bought from Amazon France

Le grand nettoyage, a 1945 cartoon by Bob De Moor

When World War 2 ends in Europe in 1945 with the German surrender to the Western Allies and the Soviet Union in late April and early May 1945, Bob De Moor was probably among the first ones to celebrate this. For years he had been waiting for the allies to liberate Europe and in the final months he had also been a victim of the retaliation attacks of Nazi-Germany on Antwerp with their doodlebugs (aka V-1 and V-2 – the V stood for ‘Vergeltungswaffe‘ in German, ‘retaliation arm’ in English) in which he lost two fingers and suffered further injuries on his legs. In short, it was time that the war ended.

"Le grand nettoyage" (1945)
“Le grand nettoyage” (1945)

And what better way to celebrate the end of World War 2 than with some cartoons?

Today we present you one of the cartoons he made during that time. The one we see here is called “Le grand nettoyage” (the big cleaning). We found the cartoon in the archives of Ludo Van Looveren and it’s our guess that the title was given by John Van Looveren, the father of Ludo and brother-in-law of Bob De Moor. It’s possible that the cartoon ended up in a french written publication though we can’t tell for sure.

Let’s take a closer look. The cartoon shows a woman cleaning a house, called Europe. She is dressed in the American Stars & Stripes, with a Union Jack scarf and the communists symbols of the hammer and sickle from the Russian flag used on her apron. The 3 countries were part of the alliance against Nazi-Germany. The rubbish that is being swept out of the house includes a machine-gun, a German helmet with bullet holes, a big swastika, several medals with swastikas on, insignias, a broken bayonet or saber, a saber hilt, and a Nazi soldier cap which is also shot to pieces. In short, the trio had been cleansing Europe from the Nazis.

The young Bob De Moor signed the drawing as Bob and also added Copyright R.D.M. (which stands for Robert De Moor, his real name). That copyright is again an indication that the drawing was meant for publication.

Barelli dissected – from polaroid to drawing for ‘Barelli in bruisend Brussel’ (part 2)

A few days ago we presented you the first article in a series of articles that will treat the genesis of the 1988 album “Barelli in bruisend Brussel”. The assistant of Bob De Moor for that album was Geert De Sutter, who took care of the background/decors in the album. Since both men only had a few months to complete the album they had to work rather fast. To get the work done in such a short time, Geert De Sutter decided to get himself a Polaroid camera and use that to sketch the decors.

The Polaroid picture used to draw the last case on page 13 of the album.
The Polaroid picture used to draw the last case on page 13 of the album.

Here’s how it went. First Bob De Moor sent him his sketched pages after which Geert went into town (he lived in Drogenbos then, a municipality located in the Belgian province of Flemish Brabant) to take the necessary pictures and start work on the decors the same day.

The Polaroid example we show you today comes from page 13 of the “Barelli in bruisend Brussel” album and represents the clock tower of the Brussels-South railway station (don’t mistake with the Tour du Midi). It’s one of 2, another clock tower can be seen at the North railway station. This clock tower was demolished when the railway station underwent a complete relook a few years later for the arrival of the TGV. Not that the station is a beauty nowadays, it has earned several nominations for worst railway station worldwide, due to the very high criminality and the not so clean reputation overall.

A before and after for the Brussels-South railway station area. Click to get a bigger picture.
A before and after for the Brussels-South railway station area. Click to get a bigger picture.

To get an idea where the tower was located you should stand in front of the Pullman Brussels Centre Gare du Midi hotel which was inaugurated in the summer of 2013 (see also the map on the left, the number 7 indicates where the clock tower stood).

On the Polaroid picture you can equally see the Côte D’Or building on the right of the tower (with the elephant), this was also included in the drawing for the Barelli album. This building was – surprise surprise –  also demolished later on when the TGV arrived in Brussels.

All in all it’s quite interesting that this album features historical documentation which people visiting Brussels nowadays won’t find back due to an inflated urbanism which has overrun Brussels and left quite some scars in the city.

Bob De Moor’s Cori as seen by Michel Pierret in 1981

To celebrate the 35 years of the Tintin Journal in 1981, the younger generation of Tintin comic artists was asked to create their version of the older generation’s work. The results were published under “Brouiller les cartes” in a special of Tintin Journal, issue 39 of 1981. 3 pages were dedicated to Bob De Moor’s work. We already showed you what Michel Weyland and Jean-Claude Servais contributed, today we give you the 3rd tribute, by Michel Pierret this time. Pierret is a Belgian scenarist and comic author mostly known for Les Aventures de Papilio (Éditions Plotch Splaf) but also for his work on Les Aigles décapitées (Glénat, collection Vécu), Hidalgos (Glénat), Les Déesses (Glénat) etc.. He decided to have a go at De Moor’s masterwork Cori, more precisely page 14 from the first story, as originally published in the Tintin Journal issue 51, from 1951.

Bob De Moor's version on the left, Michel Pierret's version on the right.
Bob De Moor’s version on the left, Michel Pierret’s version on the right.

Let’s take a closer look. Michel Pierret has 11 frames in his version, that’s one more than Bob De Moor‘s original version, but that’s due to Pierret using a standalone frame for the caption which De Moor had integrated in frame 4. The frame composition is also somewhat different as you can see, De Moor’s being more traditional.

Textually only frame 8 from De Moor’s version is different in Pierret’s version. Pierret decided to remove the line ‘Timonnier Coster’. Note that the original dutch text differs even more with the french translation, but that’s material for another article.

So let’s have a look at the action in the drawings. Whereas Pierret follows the drawings quite closely for his first and final frames, he decides to inverse the action in the Bob De Moor‘s cases numbers 5 and 7. You can see that Cori is looking to the left in De Moor’s version and to the right in Pierret’s version of case 5, this way keeping the flow of the action in the reading direction. The same happens in De Moor’s case number 7 where Michel Pierret puts the unconscious Cori on the left, again keeping the action going towards the right.

Thanks to the late Daniel Bellier for scanning these Tintin journal pages.

Bob De Moor’s Barelli as seen by Jean-Claude Servais in 1981

To celebrate the 35 years of the Tintin Journal in 1981, the younger generation of Tintin comic artists was asked to create their version of the older generation’s work. The results were published under “Brouiller les cartes” in a special of Tintin Journal, issue 39 of 1981. A few days ago we presented you the first of 3 pages which were based on Bob De Moor’s work. Today we present you the version the belgian comic author Servais (full name Jean-Claude Servais) made of the 2nd page of the first Barelli album “L’énigmatique Monsieur Barelli” which was published for the very first time in issue 31 of the Tintin journal from 1950. You might now Servais from his own work (Isabelle, La Tchalette, Tendre Violette, …) which holds some erotic touches.

The 2 versions, Bob De Moor on the left, Servais on the right.
The 2 versions, Bob De Moor on the left, Servais on the right.

But there is no erotism in his Barelli page 🙂 . On the left you can see both the version by Bob De Moor and the one by Servais. The version Bob De Moor drew is the original one as it was published 65 years ago on page 17 of issue 31 of the Tintin journal from 1950.

Once again the number of frames and even strips has been reduced compared to the original, 8 frames compared to 11 in the original and 3 strips compared to 4 strips in the original. The reason is simple, Servais‘ version stops after frame 8 of the original version, it’s not sure why really. You will also notice that Servais has opted to keep the text completely intact.

The real difference lays in 2 frames which get a more dramatic sense due to the composition. The frames 1 and 5 both have a different composition compared to the original. The frames drawn by Servais are a lot more dramatic than the ones drawn by Bob De Moor. This effect is reached by putting the back of Barelli (in frame 1) and that of the servant (frame 5) way bigger (without the feet) than in the original. It’s our belief that Bob De Moor would also have opted for this if he had drawn those pages again in a later stage of his career.

Another difference is the colour use. Servais (or his colourist) has opted for brown, yellow and red colours throughout the page whereas blue is very present on the original page. We are trying to get hold of Servais to get some more details.

Barelli dissected – the sketch and the final version of ‘Barelli in bruisend Brussel’ (part 1)

Geert De Sutter sent us a few scanned pages of the preliminary sketches Bob De Moor made. The scans exist because Bob De Moor always asked that Geert De Sutter would make A3 copies of the sketches before to start working on them. The page we show you today is the first page of the “Barelli in bruisend Brussel” album.

The initial sketched page is on the left, the final version is on the right.  Click to see the bigger version.
The initial sketched page is on the left, the final version is on the right. Click to see the bigger version.

The first thing you’ll notice is that the story is originally written in Dutch unlike the other Barelli albums which were originally written in French (and often not well translated into Dutch).

The page composition is already complete and also the characters are all placed on the page. The decors are not worked out, that will be the job for Geert De Sutter.

There are a few things though that have changed. In the first frame you see that Bob De Moor added an arrow to move the newspaper article up because the text that he wanted to add would never fit correctly in the frame. Note also that Anne Nannah is called Anna Nash here. The text itself in the news article is more or less the same although you’ll see a progressive spelling for the word ‘theater’; Bob De Moor uses ‘teater’, without the ‘h’. You also see this in the second frame where De Moor is again using the more progressive spelling, this time for the word ‘acteur’ (actor in English); he uses ‘akteur’ with a ‘k’. Note also that he had it replaced by ‘artiest’ but then reused the word ‘akteur’.

The rest of the page holds nu differences, except for the last 2 frames. You’ll see that the stickers weren’t added originally and that the objects jumping out of the luggage are a bit more diverse in the final version.

Also interesting is the text written in the left upper corner of the page. You can see the following text written by Bob De Moor: “22 Okt. verschijnt teksten geitenrijders reportage eind september”. The text itself is not really grammatically correct but it’s an interesting note, because De Moor refers to “De geitenrijders” which was the original name of the 1956 album in the Snoe & Snolleke series. The album would indeed be published in 1989, a year after this note was added via Casterman but under the title “De zondebokken”.